Creating support for neurodiversity in the workplace (2023)

The perfect storm: Pressure to diversify the workforce, need for innovation, and limited labor

Today, organizations are under pressure to integrate a diverse workforce, encourage out-of-the-box thinking to gain a competitive edge, and deal with a worker’s market.1Hiring neurodivergent workers could be an integral part of the solution to these circumstances. These professionals could not only help employers turn the tide on the current labor shortage but also bring into their organizations different and valuable ways of thinking and problem-solving that could lead to innovative solutions and give companies a competitive advantage.

Despite most companies’ increasing focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DE&I) in the workforce, the neurodivergent group is often overlooked in the diversity conversation, and consequently, hiring efforts. As a result, these individuals often experience higher rates of unemployment and underemployment compared to the general population.2 In the United States, it is estimated that 85% of people on the autism spectrum are unemployed, compared to 4.2% of the overall population.3

In this article, drawing from insights derived from interviews, case studies, and market observations, we explore the value of embracing and incorporating neurodivergent workers, and provide a framework for thinking through hiring, screening, and retention strategies.4 Throughout, potential changes are suggested relating to recruiting strategies, leadership styles, and cultural considerations that might not only help accommodate neurodivergent workers, but also could ultimately better support other diverse colleagues and neurotypical counterparts as well. These suggested strategies can help organizations not only capture the full potential of neurodivergent professionals but also better leverage the value of the overall workforce and create a better workplace for all.

Why hire neurodivergent workers?

One big benefit of an inclusive work culture is that it fosters diversity of thought, different approaches to work, innovation, and creativity. Research suggests that teams with neurodivergent professionals in some roles can be 30% more productive than those without them. Inclusion and integration of neurodivergent professionals can also boost team morale.7

Each neurodivergent person is unique, and it wouldn't be accurate to generalize their cognitive process. One neurodivergent leader we interviewed said, “When people are discussing something, I can almost see it in my head; I reorganize it and then explain it in simple terms.”8For some neurodivergent individuals, the process may be more abstract (vs. linear); for others, it may be a matter of reordering and changing the sequence, e.g., putting step 4 before step 2.

Abilities such as visual thinking, attention to detail, pattern recognition, visual memory, and creative thinking can help illuminate ideas or opportunities teams might otherwise have missed.9 As one of the neurodivergent leaders we interviewed said, “We need to move away from discussing and dealing with this topic as diversity and more about strengths and unique capabilities.”10

(Video) Designing for Neurodiversity & Workplace Inclusivity

Ensuring the success of the neurodivergent workers

In an effort to create a more diverse workplace, organizations may need to challenge their traditional workplace processes in several ways. The tactics presented below can help in creating a more diverse workplace overall, and if tailored correctly, can better serve to integrate and leverage the full potential of neurodivergent professionals (see figure 1).

Revisit the hiring process

In recent years, organizations have been consciously hiring from different sources to acquire different skill sets and capabilities. For example, an individual we interviewed shared how his team is consciously hiring from design schools for consulting roles to encourage diversity of thought and unconventional approaches. Below are some key considerations.

Cast a wider net

It is often the case that organizations continue to recruit directly from a set of colleges and universities that have few or no neurodivergent candidates. It is generally only when they cannot find matching talent directly that they partner with employment support agencies to source neurodivergent talent. One way for organizations to increase their pool of potential neurodivergent candidates is by altering their campus hiring efforts to incorporate schools that cater to neurodivergent individuals or have programs specifically for neurodivergent individuals. Fortunately, there are already many such schools, and the recruiting trend is on the upswing.12

(Video) The power of neurodiversity in the workplace

Evaluate screening criteria and processes

As the hiring process is the first interface of potential employees with the employer, it is important to minimize both recruiter and algorithmic bias. AI hiring systems coded using mostly neurotypical candidates’ data could be biased against applicants with autism due to atypical facial or speech expressions; this could result in a higher probability of neurodivergent individuals being eliminated if the algorithm is given disproportionate weightage in the hiring process.13 Thus, to avoid this potential algorithmic bias, it is important for human recruiters to validate the results of one-way AI video interviews. Likewise, recruiters may have unconscious biases; so, it is important to sensitize recruiters and hiring managers to different personality types and alert them against drawing conclusions based on deviations from what may be an expected response related to eye contact, handshake, gestures, etc.

Some companies use talent matching software in their screening process to better understand applicants’ unique abilities. This approach can help appraise hard-to-assess competencies such as risk-taking, perseverance, and emotional intelligence, along with traditional traits, such as logical reasoning and quantitative and verbal abilities. Though not without the potential for bias, it can also help the employer potentially find a better match for open roles than is possible through the traditional CV screening process and also speed up the screening of applications. For any AI tool, organizations, in consultation with their legal counsel, should consider whether and how to assess if the tool could have a disparate impact against any particular group of applicants.

Reinvent the interview

The interview process may also require tweaking. Consider moving from the abstract to specifics, and do not assume that everyone will connect the dots the same way. As one of the specialists we spoke with suggested, “During interviews, do not ask questions such as, ‘How many tennis balls fit into a swimming pool.’”14 Instead, focus on the skills needed on the job to keep the conversation closer to reality.

Some organizations have already tweaked their interview processes to better support neurodivergent applicants. Instead of packing back-to-back interviews into one day, they schedule them across several days to reduce stress on the applicants. Applicants are also allowed to use their own laptops for tests instead of a whiteboard or a company-provided device, so that they feel more comfortable.

Rather than figuring out how to rework the interview on their own, some organizations let candidates have a say on how they would like to interact with the employer, thereby “co-creating” this “first date.” Organizations could also suggest or consider trial work periods, provide opportunities to applicants to demonstrate skills, and arrange collaborative interviews (allowing the candidates to meet more employees in addition to the interviewers), as alternatives to the traditional face-to-face interview.

Expand the roles available

As with all diverse candidates, it is important to steer clear of stereotypes about neurodivergent individuals. A leader from an employment support organization for neurodivergent individuals noted that it is critical to “not categorize people into certain skillsets based on the diagnosis … When we started to talk to post-secondary institutions about who was self-identifying themselves (as neurodivergent) to their accessibility offices, there were more people self-identifying themselves from arts, then there were from STEM, contrary to popular opinion.”15

Freddie Mac, a US-based mortgage-finance company, hires people on the autism spectrum for various roles.16 Initially, they offered internships for securities analysis roles and gradually started offering positions across various departments such as enterprise risk management, information technology management, and loan processing. What started as a 16-week internship program for individuals on the autism spectrum is now a full-time employment model for individuals with autism as well as those with ADD, ADHD, and dyslexia.

Create a conducive work environment

Getting the screening and interview process right is necessary but not sufficient. Organizations should also create a culture and workplace where both neurodivergent and neurotypical individuals can thrive. Below are some key considerations.

(Video) Why You Need Neurodiverse Talent

Respect individual differences

Different professionals (whether neurodivergent or neurotypical) may have different working styles: some may need clear, multistep instructions once; some may need regular reiterations; others may be comfortable with broad asks and can break them into multistep activities themselves. Managers should find out how each professional works best, how they best understand assignments, and adapt their style accordingly.

While it may seem obvious, minor tweaks to communications, such as being more specific or including action (verbs) can go a long way. One parent of an ADHD individual explained, “If I say to my daughter, go clean your room, that means absolutely nothing to her. If I say, go upstairs, bring all your dirty clothes down, pick up everything that’s on the floor, dust the dresser, she’ll understand it.”17 Similarly, a professor to neurodivergent students explained the need to add verbs to the syllabus, such as “read chapter 1” and “solve questions 1 through 8.”18

Additionally, communicating in the virtual or hybrid environments could be a challenge to some. Individuals consume and process information differently, so miscommunication is always a risk. Following up on calls or virtual chats with an email that reinforces the message and sending notes or a transcript or recording of the call could help mitigate this risk.

Provide a mentor

Mentors provide much-needed support to allworkers’ careers,20but they are perhaps even more important for the development of the neurodivergent workforce. Organizations that provide mentors to professionals with a disability reported a 16% increase in profitability, 18% in productivity, and 12% in customer loyalty.21

Career advice is not the only support a mentor can offer. A mentor can be an advocate for the professional, playing an active role in creating opportunities and, over time, could empower the individual to build relationships and create other professional allies across the organization.

In addition to mentors, work buddies and trusted peers who make the effort to understand the individual and provide long-term commitment can help neurodivergent professionals feel more empowered. Often, a work buddy or peer emerges organically when one joins the firm; this relationship is often fostered through affinity groups such as college alumni. However, organizations that accelerate their hiring from nontraditional colleges should be aware that students from these colleges may not have an established alumni network within the organization, unlike traditional colleges and universities. The organization may need to consciously create an ecosystem of allies to help bridge this gap.

Create a culture that offers and encourages both flexibility and inflexibility

As is the case for many workers, flexibility can be especially important for neurodivergent individuals. A flexible work schedule can allow people to take time off for therapy appointments and self-care. Organizations can foster a culture of flexibility by making it part of their policy, rather than placing the responsibility on individual workers. A work-from-home arrangement may be a viable approach for those who might perform better out of a home office, especially for those who are hesitant to travel or work in a social office setting.22 As companies transition into hybrid work models post COVID-19, they should consider what kind of hybrid approach might meet the unique preferences of their neurodivergent professionals.

However, while flexible schedules may be desirable for some neurodivergent individuals, for others, a routine is what makes them thrive. One of our interviewees shared the feedback provided by a neurodivergent worker working for a government agency, regarding how this individual enjoyed the predictability and specificity of the job. She knew what she had to do and when she had to do it, and that made her feel comfortable.

(Video) Intro Video to Neurodiversity in the Workplace: Creating a Culture Where Everyone Can Thrive

Team-building activities can enable workers to interact in more informal ways, but leaders need to be careful not to let these activities define “firm culture.” Some workers may prefer not to participate in social events for a variety of reasons such as social anxiety, introversion, or their need for a routine. One professional we spoke to shared feedback from a neurodivergent worker who explained, “What I need to do to put in that eight-hour day is I need to go home, I need to have my routine, I need to have my time, so I’m best at what I do.”23 A buddy or mentor can help coworkers understand these preferences. A leader at an employment support organization for neurodivergent individuals we interviewed said, “A buddy can step in and clarify that an individual who logs off every day at 5 PM is as much a team player as someone who is staying back late and joining team dinners.”24

Understanding this need can be beneficial for broadening acceptance for both neurodivergent and neurotypical workers who may prefer not to socialize with colleagues outside of work hours. Managers should also continue to think creatively about how to embed team-building activities into core work, and foster a culture not only of acceptance, but of belonging (see the sidebar, “Creating a sense of belonging”).

Provide tailored career journeys for all

As we have already seen in our Future of Work research, offering curated, personalized work experiences not only enables workers to better contribute and develop in the workplace, but it can help the organization grow as well.28 This approach is especially relevant to the neurodivergent workforce. Some important considerations for making this happen include the following:

Frame organizational policies to support neurodiversity

Many organizations may not have specific organizational policies to support neurodivergent professionals, as they do for other minority groups (gender, race, ethnicity, etc.). Clear organizational policies can ensure that everyone understands them in the same way. It is also important to codify and specify unspoken rules that some neurodivergent workers might otherwise miss.And these policies can be helpful if intervention is required for discriminatory behavior. Organizations are better prepared for legal considerations and a clear process for intervention can be established as part of the organization policies. Further, given that neurodiversity is often invisible (see sidebar, “Broadening the lens on diversity”), organizations may want to put privacy policies in place to protect information about neurodivergent workers’ diagnoses, and/or craft individualized approaches based on individual worker's preferences.

When formulating policies for neurodiversity, organizations could consider targets for hiring neurodivergent talent, developed in consultation with legal counsel, in addition to common diversity headcount targets. It is also important to take these efforts beyond discrete projects to multiyear commitments with metrics for goals and progress. And when designing any program, it is important to involve neurodivergent team members in the process and ensure that inputs from potential recipients of the program are incorporated.

Do not predefine what success/growth should look like

Growth and career path mean different things to different people. While some may aspire to ascend to higher levels (e.g., some of the directors we interviewed), for others, success might mean being in a role they like; not everyone wants to become a leader in a traditional hierarchy. Some may prefer to work in teams, others may prefer to work alone. Thus, to ensure success in a role, it is important for organizations to deliberate on tailored career paths that recognize the goals, capabilities, and strengths of the individual—whether neurodivergent or neurotypical.

Offer new roles in the capacity of mentor/coach

As neurodivergent professionals become experienced in their roles, they could evolve as mentors or coaches and pay it forward to other neurodivergent professionals in the organization. Eventually, this pool could become a strong network where professionals not only feel like they belong but are able to leverage each other’s experiences for individual/organizational good.

Parting thoughts

As organizations are increasingly challenged to rethink many of their workforce strategies and long-standing recipes for success, embracing and unleashing the potential of the neurodivergent workforce opens up opportunities. Many US companies are now more open to hiring neurodivergent workers and are willing to make the adjustments required. Given the benefits these professionals bring in relation to innovation and productivity, organizations that do not move in this direction risk losing out to other organizations that provide professionals a safe and progressive work environment.

What organizations do to provide an inclusive environment for their neurodivergent workforce can have spillover effects on the entire workforce. What leaders and managers learn from finding solutions for the unique needs of neurodivergent professionals can be applied to the entire workforce. Common considerations for neurodivergent professionals may alter traditional HR practices but can inevitably make the workplace a better, safer, and more inclusive place for everyone.

(Video) BBC World News: Why should employers support neurodiversity in the workplace? | Nathaniel Hawley

FAQs

What of the following actions can Organisations take to promote neurodiversity? ›

Raise awareness and promote a diverse workforce

Make sure your employees and managers have the knowledge and breadth of understanding on what it means to create and empower a diverse team. Create a culture where individuals feel comfortable to disclose and talk openly about their neurodiversity.

Why is is important to learn neurodiversity as future teachers how will this benefit you as teachers? ›

Neurodiversity helps support inclusion by convincing the regular classroom teacher that adding neurodiverse students will actually make the classroom better; that students with neurodiversities will bring in positive qualities, attributes, and gifts to make a positive contribution to the class.

Why employers should be hiring with neurodiversity in mind? ›

Greater productivity: Research suggests that teams with neurodivergent professionals in some roles can be 30% more productive than those without them. Enhanced management and leadership skillsets: As management works with neurodiverse minds, they strengthen their own leadership qualities and become more inclusive.

Why is neurodiversity in the workplace important? ›

People that are neurodivergent have talents, perspectives and skills that can be beneficial in many work environments. Hiring neurodiverse employees can provide companies with a competitive edge that brings measurable benefits, both financially and in terms of workplace culture.

How do you handle a neurodivergent employee? ›

So, How Should We 'Manage' Neurodivergent Workers?
  1. One: Understand the Breadth and Depth of Neurodiversity. ...
  2. Two: Reach Out Directly to Subject Specialists for Advice. ...
  3. Three: Take Steps to Create a Supportive Environment. ...
  4. Four: Walk the Extra Mile by Providing Extra Mentoring.
16 May 2022

How do people with neurodiverse communicate? ›

Communication
  1. try to avoid using jokes, sarcasm or ambiguous statements;
  2. be clear and direct, using concise sentences;
  3. use short sentences in written communications;
  4. sometimes diagrams are better than written communications or instructions;
  5. where appropriate, use closed rather than open questions;
20 Jan 2020

What does it mean to embrace neurodiversity? ›

Neurodiversity is a viewpoint that brain differences are normal, rather than deficits. Neurodivergent people experience, interact with, and interpret the world in unique ways. This concept can help reduce stigma around learning and thinking differences.

What are examples of neurodiversity? ›

ADHD, Autism, Dyspraxia, Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, and Tourette's syndrome are all examples of neurodiverse conditions. They're diagnostic labels used to explain the diverse ways of thinking, learning, processing and behaving. As with all people, we each have our talents and challenges.

Why is it important to learn about neurodiversity? ›

Neurodiverse people may interpret, interact with, and experience the world in unique ways. The concept of neurodiversity helps to reduce stigma around how different people learn and think differently from others.

What is the goal of the neurodiversity movement? ›

The goal of neurodiversity rights advocates is to expand our definition of what is viewed as normal and acceptable rather than attempting to alter those behaviors as a matter of course. It's a debate that divides the ASD community and many of the professionals who treat autism.

What is the best way to support neurodiverse students? ›

What Every Teacher Should Know About Neurodiverse Learners by MacLean Gander
  1. Start with the student and where they are: ...
  2. Make instruction and expectations explicit: ...
  3. Teach in ways that reach the information-processing differences in the classroom: ...
  4. Provide alternative modes of assessment: ...
  5. Tolerance for error:

How does society benefit from neurodiversity? ›

Benefits of Neurodiversity to our Society

Employers are discovering that neurodiverse persons have inimitable abilities in spotting patterns and trends. They make operation processes smoother and better at the workplace and are more efficient in some tasks.

How do you recruit neurodiversity? ›

Getting Started
  1. Recruit. Build a pipeline of talent that includes people with disabilities.
  2. Hire. Identify people who have the skills and attributes for the job.
  3. Retain. Keep talented employees with disabilities, including those who acquire them on the job.
  4. Advance.

How does the concept of neurodiversity apply to ethics? ›

The concept of neurodiversity is relatively recent and has important ethical implications in signaling that there is no single way to be “normal.” In this chapter I explore this notion in relation to the neurodevelopmental condition of autism, taking a historical approach to show how attitudes have changed in parallel ...

How does the concept of neurodiversity apply to emotional intelligence? ›

Awareness of feelings is at the heart of EI and is core to its development. Neurodiversity is often associated with poor emotional awareness and difficulty in reading the emotional 'cues' in others, so this is an area that the EI self-development programme places a lot of emphasis upon.

What is a neurodiverse team? ›

Instead, neurodiversity embraces the idea that diversity in ways of thinking can lead to increases in productivity, spur innovation and create an overall competitive advantage for organizations. And that individual's neurological conditions represent a vast, untapped source of talent and creativity.

How do you supervise an autistic employee? ›

The following tips provide insight into the unique strengths of autistic workers and may help your company successfully hire employees with autism.
  1. Focus on can, not can't. ...
  2. Consider essential functions. ...
  3. Be open to reasonable accommodations. ...
  4. Promote kindness. ...
  5. Make compliance a priority.

How do you handle an employee with ADHD? ›

Create accommodations in the workplace.
  1. Cut down on distractions so they can focus better and stay on task. ...
  2. Create daily routines for them to follow.
  3. Give them more time to finish tasks or training and follow up to see if they need help understanding any part of their work.
14 Jul 2022

How do you manage autism at work? ›

Here are a few helpful tips that employers can follow when supporting employees who have autism.
  1. Provide Clear Directions. ...
  2. Bring in Outside Support. ...
  3. Provide Reasonable Accommodations. ...
  4. Educate and Train Other Employees. ...
  5. Designate a Mentor or Buddy. ...
  6. Provide Consistent, Constructive Feedback.
15 Nov 2019

How can we help neurodivergent people? ›

People who are Neurodivergent often need routine and structure. Spacial layouts can help here – having zones with territorial desking for instance. And as stretching helps those with Tourettes or Autism to improve focus, a designated quiet area for this could be beneficial.

How do you treat a neurodivergent person? ›

Some of the most important things you should keep in mind include:
  1. Listen. ...
  2. Communicate in ways that help them. ...
  3. Avoid value-based labels. ...
  4. No two neurodivergent people are the same. ...
  5. Don't assume that anyone is incapable or unintelligent. ...
  6. Treat everyone with respect.

When communicating with neurodiverse persons What should an HR professional be prepared to do? ›

Communicate clearly using straightforward language.

Therefore, avoiding sarcasm and expressions that may be misunderstood or misinterpreted can go a long way. Neurodiverse colleagues will understand you more easily if you state your emotions and ask specific questions rather than open-ended ones.

What should be done to make work environments more inclusive to neurodivergent individuals? ›

Creative inclusive work environments.

Provide noise cancelling headphones or quiet spaces for those with sensory needs. Maintain large print physical copies of company policies and employee handbooks. Create or encourage the creation of an employee resource group for neurodivergent or differently abled employees.

What falls under the umbrella of neurodiversity? ›

ADHD, Autism, Dyspraxia, and Dyslexia all fall within the spectrum of “Neurodiversity” and are all neurodiverse conditions. Neuro-differences are recognised and appreciated as a social category similar to differences in ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, or ability.

Is neurodiversity considered a disability? ›

Neurodiversity isn't the same thing as disability. Though, people who have neurodivergent features may need accommodations at work or school.

What is another word for neurodivergent? ›

Neurovariance — Another way to describe neurodiversity or neurodivergent. On the Spectrum — On the spectrum refers to someone who is on the Autism spectrum or with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder).

How do you teach neurodiversity? ›

How to teach about neurodiversity in schools
  1. Diverse representation in resources and topics.
  2. Explicit teaching about neurodiversity.
  3. Normalise different learning styles and learning needs.
  4. Teach you learners that 'fair' doesn't always mean 'the same'
  5. Work closely with families.
18 Feb 2022

What is neurodiversity What are some reasons why it should be celebrated and not treated as a disorder? ›

Neurodiversity is a scientific concept arising from brain imaging. A number of brain studies have shown that people with learning or thinking differences are “wired” differently than their peers. In other words, some children are born with brains that think, learn and process information differently than others.

What is the difference between mental illness and neurodiversity? ›

The most obvious way to distinguish the examples I have given so far would be to use “neurodiversity” to refer to all inborn variation, and “mental disorder” to refer to those psychiatric disabilities caused by hostile environments.

What is the difference between neurodiverse and neurodivergent? ›

The word "Neurodiverse" refers to a group of people where some members of that group are neurodivergent. A neurodivergent person is defined as one whose neurological development and state are atypical, usually viewed as abnormal or extreme.

Is neurodiversity the same as autism? ›

So, within the neurodiversity paradigm, Autism is not the same as neurodivergent (they are not equivalent), but Autistic brains are neurodivergent, since they do not develop along the expected trajectory.

What neurodiversity is not? ›

Before I go into details, let me summarize what the neurodiversity movement does believe: Autism and other neurological variations (learning disabilities, ADHD, etc.) may be disabilities, but they are not flaws. People with neurological differences are not broken or incomplete versions of normal people.

What are the 8 reasons we need neurodiversity in the classroom? ›

8 Reasons Why We Need Neurodiversity in Education
  • Higher Expectations Lead to Higher Achievement. ...
  • We Need a Growth Paradigm to Replace a Deficit Paradigm. ...
  • Neurodiversity Supports the Inclusion Movement. ...
  • Neurodiversity Aligns with a School's Other Programs and Policies on Diversity.
23 Apr 2018

Do neurodivergent people learn differently? ›

Neurotypicals learn things more quickly in the ways that information is currently typically presented, whereas neurodiverse people may find it harder to process facts presented in this form. The latter may need more training time or different approaches because their brains are wired differently.

Why is neurodiversity in the workplace important? ›

People that are neurodivergent have talents, perspectives and skills that can be beneficial in many work environments. Hiring neurodiverse employees can provide companies with a competitive edge that brings measurable benefits, both financially and in terms of workplace culture.

Which of the following are benefits of neurodiversity for employers? ›

The increased ability to work remotely and to manage workplace interaction online during the pandemic facilitated working and greater productivity for many neurodivergent workers. For many it demonstrated that working flexibly can improve opportunities and outcomes for both employers and neurodiverse workers.

What percentage of the workforce is neurodiverse? ›

Why a neurodiverse workforce matters. Somewhere between 10% and 20% of the global population is considered neurodivergent, according to consultancy and auditing firm Deloitte.

How do you handle a neurodivergent employee? ›

So, How Should We 'Manage' Neurodivergent Workers?
  1. One: Understand the Breadth and Depth of Neurodiversity. ...
  2. Two: Reach Out Directly to Subject Specialists for Advice. ...
  3. Three: Take Steps to Create a Supportive Environment. ...
  4. Four: Walk the Extra Mile by Providing Extra Mentoring.
16 May 2022

Why employers should be hiring with neurodiversity in mind? ›

Greater productivity: Research suggests that teams with neurodivergent professionals in some roles can be 30% more productive than those without them. Enhanced management and leadership skillsets: As management works with neurodiverse minds, they strengthen their own leadership qualities and become more inclusive.

What are some examples of neurodiversity? ›

ADHD, Autism, Dyspraxia, Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, and Tourette's syndrome are all examples of neurodiverse conditions. They're diagnostic labels used to explain the diverse ways of thinking, learning, processing and behaving. As with all people, we each have our talents and challenges.

How do you unmask a neurodivergent? ›

Unmasking requires non-autistic people to be more inclusive and welcoming of their neurodivergent peers – whether they are autistic, have ADHD, Tourette's syndrome, dyslexia or anything else. Here are two important ways to be an ally: Communicate as clearly as possible and avoid turns of phrase.

Is ADHD a form of autism? ›

Autism spectrum disorder and ADHD are related in several ways. ADHD is not on the autism spectrum, but they have some of the same symptoms. And having one of these conditions increases the chances of having the other. Experts have changed the way they think about how autism and ADHD are related.

Is there a test for neurodiversity? ›

Online Neurodiversity Tests. You can take these online tests to see if you have traits of neurodiversity, such as dyslexia or dyspraxia, or autism. Please note: the results are not a diagnosis, they can be used to indicate whether you may have traits of that neurodivergence.

How does the concept of neurodiversity apply to ethics? ›

The concept of neurodiversity is relatively recent and has important ethical implications in signaling that there is no single way to be “normal.” In this chapter I explore this notion in relation to the neurodevelopmental condition of autism, taking a historical approach to show how attitudes have changed in parallel ...

How do you recruit neurodiversity? ›

Getting Started
  1. Recruit. Build a pipeline of talent that includes people with disabilities.
  2. Hire. Identify people who have the skills and attributes for the job.
  3. Retain. Keep talented employees with disabilities, including those who acquire them on the job.
  4. Advance.

How do you talk to someone with neurodiversity? ›

Communication
  1. try to avoid using jokes, sarcasm or ambiguous statements;
  2. be clear and direct, using concise sentences;
  3. use short sentences in written communications;
  4. sometimes diagrams are better than written communications or instructions;
  5. where appropriate, use closed rather than open questions;
20 Jan 2020

What are some examples of neurodiversity? ›

ADHD, Autism, Dyspraxia, Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, Dysgraphia, and Tourette's syndrome are all examples of neurodiverse conditions. They're diagnostic labels used to explain the diverse ways of thinking, learning, processing and behaving. As with all people, we each have our talents and challenges.

How does the concept of Neurodiversity apply to emotional intelligence? ›

Awareness of feelings is at the heart of EI and is core to its development. Neurodiversity is often associated with poor emotional awareness and difficulty in reading the emotional 'cues' in others, so this is an area that the EI self-development programme places a lot of emphasis upon.

Is Neurodiversity a disability? ›

Neurodiversity isn't the same thing as disability. Though, people who have neurodivergent features may need accommodations at work or school. "Neurodiverse students are wonderful students," Cussler says. "They can be really creative, big-picture, out-of-the box thinkers.

How can we move away from the stigma of Neurodiversity being regarded as something to fix? ›

We can move away from the stigma of neurodiversity being regarded as something to fix and toward an understanding of it as a normal variation of humanity by treating others the way you want to be treated. Before you judge, put yourself in their shoes.

What is the symbol for neurodiversity? ›

The rainbow infinity sign is the symbol for neurodiversity. The full spectrum of colors represents the diversity of the autism spectrum as well as the greater neurodiversity movement.

What are the benefits of neurodiversity? ›

In “Neurodiversity as a Competitive Advantage,” Harvard Business Review notes that certain neurodivergent conditions “can bestow special skills in pattern recognition, memory, or mathematics.” When provided with a more inclusive hiring and onboarding process, neurodiverse candidates often outperform their neurotypical ...

What is neurodiversity inclusion? ›

What is neurodiversity? Neurodiversity is a term used to describe the variety of human neurocognitive abilities. This recognizes that everyone has differences in how they learn and function, and most people have special talents and areas they struggle with. For some of us, these differences are more pronounced.

What is Neurodiversity in the workplace? ›

Neurodiversity describes the natural way that people think, learn, perceive the world, interact and process information differently.

How do you communicate with a neurodivergent partner? ›

Avoid reactivity and criticisms of character - Talk to the best in your partner. Accept and reframe your partner's behaviours as 'different wiring' and avoid personalising or taking to heart matters unintended to hurt. Turn frustration into compassion, understanding and gratitude (calming the amygdala)

How can I help a neurodivergent partner? ›

Being clear about needs in a conversation can offer structure to the neurodiverse partner's response and conversational engagement. This often requires psychoeducation for a neurotypical partner to support them in learning ways to more clearly and effectively communicate their needs to their spouse.

What is the most common neurodivergent? ›

Some of the conditions that are most common among those who describe themselves as neurodivergent include: Autism spectrum disorder (this includes what was once known as Asperger's syndrome). Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Down syndrome.

What percentage of the workforce is neurodiverse? ›

Why a neurodiverse workforce matters. Somewhere between 10% and 20% of the global population is considered neurodivergent, according to consultancy and auditing firm Deloitte.

Videos

1. Creating a Neurodiverse Friendly Workplace
(PTF Summits)
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